Posts Tagged ‘drawing’

Beginning Adult Drawing

Nov 18, 2014

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Apr 7, 2015 to Apr 28, 2015 at North Valley Senior Center

Charcoal Drawing

Beginning Adult Drawing Classes at the Albuquerque North Valley Senior Center Begin April 7th, 2015 through the April 28th, 2015. Register online here or call the Senior Center and Register at the front desk. Address: 3825 4th St NW, Albuquerque, NM 87107  Phone:(505) 761-4025

No Experience Necessary, Sign up even if you can only draw stick figures.

Elaine Cimino, who taught college drawing and painting for 20 years, is offering drawinglessons to senior center members 50+ adults.

Learn how draw using the chiaroscuro “3D” techniques Use of pencil, ink, and charcoal Brush up on value, composition and formal elements of design and art Apply to various mediums and genres using still life and landscape photos. The supplies included

Reminder Children’s Born To Draw Saturday Morning Art Classes

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Register for Born to Draw on Saturday Mornings at UNM Continuing Education Art ExhibitionsBlogChildren’s Art EducationChildren’s Classes, January 5, 2013 Registration for the Born to Draw Saturday Morning Classes First Session Begins January 26th Born to Draw Saturday Mornings 2 sessions:  Total length of class time 2 hours including set up and clean upSession 1: January 26 – March 2, 2012 10 am – 12 noonSession 2: March 23            – April 27, 2012 10 am – 12 noon 

Course Proposal and Syllabus: 

Session 1

Born to Draw: A Children’s Drawing Program

The Born to Draw program is designed for children in grades K-6th. The Children’s Spring Workshop will be for children 7-11 years of age. The course is designed to teach observational drawing though shape relationships. The students will learn formal elements of drawing such as mark making, line, shape, placement, angels, textures, value, color, and perspective. Session A runs from January 26 to March 2, 2013

Each class is geared for the child to complete a drawing within the allotted 40-50 minutes or less time frame. The Born to Draw Step-by-Step Drawing program features animals and still life. Children should know basic shapes of the square, triangle, circle and oval. I encourage parents to have their children attend both sessions. Session B runs from March 23 to April 27

The classes will be offered for two 50-minute sessions with a five-minute break and time for set up and clean up included in the class.  Total length of class time is 2 hours.

Drawing and Art Techniques

Depending on the age and the child’s development and skill levels, it is possible to evolve into another session for a continuum of developing drawing skills.  Throughout the class the children will experiment with different media that include watercolor, color pencil,  pen and ink.

Painting by Cezanne Still Life – 1890-94 oil on canvas

Session 2

Drawing Still Life

Drawing from 3D objects increases your children’s knowledge of the effects of light on form, volume and line. Observational drawing teaches one to learn to see. Students will work with still-life setups, start with simple materials and compositions, then move to more complicated media exploring textures and concepts. This is a great class to begin studies in art or to improve drawing skills.

Painting of Giorgio Morandi Modern still life

In this session the students will be introduced to great master artists like Cezanne, Matisse, Morandi, O’Keeffe and Steir.

The second session builds on the first session, however, all beginning drawers are welcome.  Beginners who have not had the Born to Draw classes’ prior will start with the curriculum of the first session.

17544 Born to Draw: A Children’s Drawing Program (ages 7-11), Section A Tuition: $160.00 Saturday 10:00 am – 12:00 pm; 6 sessions starting January 26, 2013, ending March 2, 2013  Location: CE South Building   Instructor: Cimino    Materials Cost: $0.00  Available Discounts Available 11/26/2012 17544 Born to Draw: A Children’s Drawing Program (ages 7-11), Section B Tuition: $160.00 Saturday 10:00 am – 12:00 pm; 6 sessions starting March 23, 2013, ending April 27, 2013  Location: CE South Building   Instructor: Cimino    Materials Cost: $0.00  Available Discounts Available 3/23/2013

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Warhol Warhol Everywhere

Nov 23, 2012

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BY Rachel Wolff

A quarter century after Andy Warhol’s death, his work resonates more than ever. Several museum exhibitions are focusing on his influence in painting, photography, film, performance, and more

Deborah Kass, 16 Barbras (The Jewish Jackie Series), 1992,
a Warhol-inspired series with wit and irony added

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND PAUL KASMIN GALLERY, NEW YORK.

“The worst thing that could happen to you after the end of your time would be to be embalmed and laid up in a pyramid,” Andy Warhol wrote in his 1975 book The Philosophy of Andy Warhol (From A to B and Back Again). “[I] like the idea of people turning into sand or something, so the machinery keeps working after you die. … I guess disappearing would be shirking work that your machinery still had left to do.”

Few artists are so eager and able to accurately assess their legacy, but there is something eerily prescient about Warhol’s grainy conception of death. His machinery, it seems, is still very much ticking away. His themes, processes, personas, and approach to making art are evident in everything from the ready-mades and Pop portraits of his direct descendents to the work of some of the most boundary-pushing conceptualists, abstract painters, and video artists working today. → Read more

Universal Concern that Creativity is Suffering at Work and School

Aug 30, 2012

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The more research that I do I am finding that we are falling behind in our ability to be creative and support creativity at home, in schools and the workplace. Adobe released a study this past spring on how creativity is suffering. The results showed that Americans think their lack of time, money and tools are barriers to creativity. Rightly so, the American system is slowly grinding the gears of conceptual and critical thought to a halt by adopting an ideology that only looks at the productivity of test scores in the educational system. This has resulted in massive cuts to teachers jobs, and is disproportionately cutting History, Physical Education and both the Visual and Performing Arts.  The arts represents at least 37% of the entire population who are visual thinkers and problem solvers. This is why I am working on the Born to Draw Art Program because it is a way to bring drawing and the arts to children and adults, to get people to use their hands and minds once again.

See the www.borntodraw.com website  Let me know how we might be able to create a space where we can roll out the Born to Draw® art curriculum.

Universal Concern that Creativity is Suffering at Work and School

SAN JOSE, Calif. — April 23, 2012 — New research reveals a global creativity gap in five of the world’s largest economies, according to the Adobe® (Nasdaq:ADBE) State of Create global benchmark study. The research shows 8 in 10 people feel that unlocking creativity is critical to economic growth and nearly two-thirds of respondents feel creativity is valuable to society, yet a striking minority – only 1 in 4 people – believe they are living up to their own creative potential.

Interviews of 5,000 adults across the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, France and Japan expose surprising attitudes and beliefs about creativity, providing new insights into the role of creativity in business, education and society overall.

Workplace Creativity Gap The study reveals a workplace creativity gap, where 75% of respondents said they are under growing pressure to be productive rather than creative, despite the fact that they are increasingly expected to think creatively on the job. Across all of the countries surveyed, people said they spend only 25% of their time at work creating. Lack of time is seen as the biggest barrier to creativity (47% globally, 52% in United States).

Education Concerns More than half of those surveyed feel that creativity is being stifled by their education systems, and many believe creativity is taken for granted (52% globally, 70% in the United States).

“One of the myths of creativity is that very few people are really creative,” said Sir Ken Robinson, Ph.D., an internationally recognized leader in the development of education, creativity and innovation. “The truth is that everyone has great capacities but not everyone develops them. One of the problems is that too often our educational systems don’t enable students to develop their natural creative powers. Instead, they promote uniformity and standardization. The result is that we’re draining people of their creative possibilities and, as this study reveals, producing a workforce that’s conditioned to prioritize conformity over creativity.”

Creativity Rating: Japan Ranked Most Creative The study sheds light on different cultural attitudes toward creativity. Japan ranked highest in the global tally as the most creative country while, conversely, Japanese citizens largely do not see themselves as creative. Globally, Tokyo ranked as the most creative city – except among Japanese – with New York ranking second. Outside of Japan, national pride in each country is evident, with residents of the United Kingdom, Germany and France ranking their own countries and cities next in line after Japan.

The United States ranked globally as the second most creative nation among the countries surveyed, except in the eyes of Americans, who see themselves as the most creative. Yet Americans also expressed the greatest sense of urgency and concern that they are not living up to their creative potential (United States at 82%, vs. the lowest level of concern in Germany at 64%).

Generational and gender differences are marginal, reinforcing the idea that everyone has the potential to create. Women ranked only slightly higher than men when asked if they self-identified as creative and whether they were tapping their own creative potential.

Four in 10 people believe that they do not have the tools or access to tools to create. Creative tools are perceived as the biggest driver to increase creativity (65% globally, 76% in the United States), and technology is recognized for its ability to help individuals overcome creative limitations (58% globally, 60% in the United States) and provide inspiration (53% globally, 62% in the United States).

About the Adobe State of Create Study The study was produced by research firm StrategyOne and conducted as an online survey among a total of 5,000 adults, 18 years or older, 1,000 each in the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, France and Japan. Interviewing took place from March 30 to April 9. The data set for each country is nationally representative of the population of that country.

For more information on the research results visit Adobe State of Create Global Benchmark Study and Adobe State of Create Infographic.

This oil painting resulted from a computer generated image that I designed for the Born to Draw Children’s Art Drawing Program. The computer image was to be a demo from the Matisse cut-out project that teach color and shape relationships to 3rd grade -6th grade children.

The composition of the piece had to fit an elongated format of the slab door without looking like a montage of two pictures juxtaposed.

There were objects changes from the original sketch.  The paint is drying now  and after completely dried I would like to apply to the painting a non-yellowing and UV protect varnish.  There is not enough time to do that and allow the painting to completely dry before the artist reception. The painting was completed on a slab door 30″ by 80″ in oil. The sides and back ofhte painting is stain natural and has a hand wax and polished finish.

I hope that whomever purchases “When Life Serves You Lemons…”  enjoys the painting for a very long time.

 

Come learn about the artist within you.

Elaine Cimino  will be speaking about the the Born to Draw Children’s and Adult Drawing Program, as part of the Spirit, Mind and Body Month Series program at the HB Horn YMCA 4901 Indian School Rd. NE March 14th 2012 at 6 PM

Come listen, learn and experience the Born to Draw program.  Children, Parents, Teachers all adults are invited.

Elemental Vortex

For more information visit the website at www.elaineciminostudios.com or www.BorntoDraw.com

or call 505 604-9772

I completed my presentation to the schools, teachers and parents and now working on collateral materials. When the new Web site is finished this will be a stellar art education website that will hopefully be of value to teachers, students and parents. Please follow me on Twitter @ciminostudios and on our Facebook page. Elaine Cimino Studios and on www.borntodraw.com and Facebook Born to Draw Children’s Art Education. And where ever you can please like us to your Facebook Friends. Thanks for your support.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWMoEZVB1uU

Photo: AP A woman looks at Mexican painter Diego Rivera's 'Indian Warrior' displayed during a preview at New York's Museum of Modern Art, November 8, 2011.

Carolyn Weaver | New York Voice of America Creative Commons license

A woman looks at Mexican painter Diego Rivera’s ‘Indian Warrior’ displayed during a preview at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, November 8, 2011.

In 1931, the fledgling Museum of Modern Art chose Mexican muralist Diego Rivera for its second major show, inviting him to New York to create “portable” murals onsite. Now, some of the works he created in six feverish weeks are again on display at MoMA.

They are aggressive and vibrant, testimony to Rivera’s fascination with Mexican history and his loathing of capitalism.

A communist, Rivera created fiercely political works picturing Mexico’s colonial past and the struggles of indigenous peoples. Indian Warrior, for example, illustrates his anger at Spain’s conquest of Mexico in the 1600s. An Aztec warrior wearing a fearsome Jaguar costume uses a stone knife to cut down a conquistador who lies dead, still encased in his armor.

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Rivera also painted scenes of what he saw as capitalist oppression in the U.S. and the struggle for workers’ rights in a rapidly industrializing America.

“He made pictures that made us think about what our society is like, about labor and class, and the inequities of our modern world,” MoMA curator Leah Dickerman said. She points to the mural, Frozen Assets, a depiction of New York City, in 1931, in the depths of the Great Depression. The mural has several tiers, with New York’s new skyscrapers towering above what looks like a subterranean morgue.

“In the top tier of the painting, you see all the most recent landmarks of modern architecture,” Dickerman says. “Under that, you see the shelter for unemployed men that was on East 25th Street. Then under that, you see a bank vault where the city’s richest citizens are waiting to count their assets.”

Rivera was already famous when he and his wife, artist Frida Kahlo, arrived in New York for the MoMA commission. Born in 1886, Rivera had studied painting in Europe in the early 1900s.

There he developed, then abandoned, an interest in Cubism in favor of realistic frescoes – paintings on wet plaster – focusing on Mexico’s revolution. At the time, murals were Mexico’s leading public art form.

The show also includes watercolors from a visit to Moscow in 1927-1928, where Rivera celebrated the tenth anniversary of the Soviet revolution.

Visitors have packed the show since its opening in November. Art historian Anna Indych-Lopez said that’s because Rivera’s message remains relevant.

“This work speaks to people today for obvious reasons,” she said. “If we just open up the newspaper and look at the events surrounding Occupy Wall Street, these are issues that have not gone away.”

“What he was showing, really, was his interest in the uprising of the common people,” says visitor Lenore Zarin. Paula Santos, also visiting the show, said as a Mexican American, she was touched by Rivera’s dedication to “people you don’t usually see, indigenous people.” “It was really poignant for me,” she said, “that even today, he could have painted those frescoes.”

The MoMA show also includes a sketch for one of Rivera’s most famous works, although few people ever saw it.

Man at the Crossroads was the title of the work commissioned in 1933 by New York’s Rockefeller family, for one of its Rockefeller Center buildings. It was supposed to illustrate the progress of “civilization” on a grand scale. But a controversy erupted in the press over Rivera’s insertion of a small portrait of Lenin. The artist refused the Rockefellers’ request to remove it, and he was dismissed. The mural was covered up and later destroyed.

Indych-Lopez, an expert on Rivera, said the artist’s radical politics, typical among Mexican artists of the time, was indulged by his patrons, including MoMA founder Abby Aldrich Rockefeller.

Indych-Lopez said the management of Rockefeller Center, charged with leasing office space in the building, strongly objected.

“They believed they had to make a public stand against this very overt visualization of communism, the fact that this was a public gesture that would have faced workers entering into the heart of capitalism day in and day out,” she said.

Dickerman and Indych-Lopez also cite reports that the Rockefellers were offended by the inclusion of a portrait that appeared to be the teetotaling patriarch, John D. Rockefeller, holding a drink, during the period of prohibition.

In the ensuing furor, Rivera lost a commission to paint at the World’s Fair in Chicago. Undaunted, he returned to Mexico City and created an almost identical mural for the Palacio De Bellas Artes.

The show at MoMA is on view until mid-May 2012.