Posts Tagged ‘painting’

Elaine Cimino Studios

Registration for Art Classes July through December 2012

at the North Valley Senior Center

Lila A Showgir

Please check a class and spark your creativity

o Learn Watercolor –July 17th  –September 11th for 8 wks Cost: $75.00 o Pastel Workshop – September 18th– October 30th for 6wks Cost: $65.00 o Drawing for the Holidays and Special Occasions- November 6th -December 18th  for 6 wks Cost: $65.00

All Classes will be on Tuesday Afternoons at 4:30pm – 6:30pm

Method of payment

Eggplant

Cash, Check: Make payable to: Elaine Cimino Studios

Use SASE available at Senior Center Office

or use PayPal  http://www.paypal.com  for online payment

Instructions for PayPal, Go to PayPal website.

Click  “send money” Button You will send to my email address

Contact me through this website

This oil painting resulted from a computer generated image that I designed for the Born to Draw Children’s Art Drawing Program. The computer image was to be a demo from the Matisse cut-out project that teach color and shape relationships to 3rd grade -6th grade children.

The composition of the piece had to fit an elongated format of the slab door without looking like a montage of two pictures juxtaposed.

There were objects changes from the original sketch.  The paint is drying now  and after completely dried I would like to apply to the painting a non-yellowing and UV protect varnish.  There is not enough time to do that and allow the painting to completely dry before the artist reception. The painting was completed on a slab door 30″ by 80″ in oil. The sides and back ofhte painting is stain natural and has a hand wax and polished finish.

I hope that whomever purchases “When Life Serves You Lemons…”  enjoys the painting for a very long time.

 

Come learn about the artist within you.

Elaine Cimino  will be speaking about the the Born to Draw Children’s and Adult Drawing Program, as part of the Spirit, Mind and Body Month Series program at the HB Horn YMCA 4901 Indian School Rd. NE March 14th 2012 at 6 PM

Come listen, learn and experience the Born to Draw program.  Children, Parents, Teachers all adults are invited.

Elemental Vortex

For more information visit the website at www.elaineciminostudios.com or www.BorntoDraw.com

or call 505 604-9772

When Life serves you Lemons... is the title of the piece for the Sawmill land trust art action to be held on April 24th at the Hotel Albuquerque 5-8 pm

 

This is the painting I just finished today called, “When life serves you lemons…” I am working on it in a corner of my kitchen. It is for a fundraiser for the Sawmill Land Trust art auction they picked 25 artists and will have a reception April 6th and the Art Auction will be held at the Hotel Albuquerque April 26th 5-8pm. The painting is a homage to Henri Matisse and a painting that should sell. It is painted on a door slab 30″ x 80 ” painted in oils. it is up to the buyer of the painting to use as an artwork or a door.

“No Place Like Home”

is the theme of Sawmill Community Land Trust’s upcoming Door Show and Auction. The Show will take place on April 6th on St. Clair Winery /Bistro’s East Patio and the auction occurs on Thursday April 26th, 2012 at Hotel Albuquerque. participating artists will create their vision of the theme on 32″ x 80″ interior slab doors. The doors are intended to be blank canvases and the donors will end up with the option to hang them as art pieced of transform them into doors.

A door is a symbol of new opportunity, hope and promise.

“No place like home”

Follow the progress on Www.ElaineCiminosSudios Website as she creates the work in progress and participates in the auction.

The donations for this event goes to the Sawmill Community land Trust which is a nNGO that works to break the cycle of poverty and revitalize neighborhoods through the creation of quality, affordable housing and sustainable economic opportunities for low -to moderate income individuals and families in Bernalillo County.

I completed my presentation to the schools, teachers and parents and now working on collateral materials. When the new Web site is finished this will be a stellar art education website that will hopefully be of value to teachers, students and parents. Please follow me on Twitter @ciminostudios and on our Facebook page. Elaine Cimino Studios and on www.borntodraw.com and Facebook Born to Draw Children’s Art Education. And where ever you can please like us to your Facebook Friends. Thanks for your support.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eWMoEZVB1uU

Photo: AP A woman looks at Mexican painter Diego Rivera's 'Indian Warrior' displayed during a preview at New York's Museum of Modern Art, November 8, 2011.

Carolyn Weaver | New York Voice of America Creative Commons license

A woman looks at Mexican painter Diego Rivera’s ‘Indian Warrior’ displayed during a preview at New York’s Museum of Modern Art, November 8, 2011.

In 1931, the fledgling Museum of Modern Art chose Mexican muralist Diego Rivera for its second major show, inviting him to New York to create “portable” murals onsite. Now, some of the works he created in six feverish weeks are again on display at MoMA.

They are aggressive and vibrant, testimony to Rivera’s fascination with Mexican history and his loathing of capitalism.

A communist, Rivera created fiercely political works picturing Mexico’s colonial past and the struggles of indigenous peoples. Indian Warrior, for example, illustrates his anger at Spain’s conquest of Mexico in the 1600s. An Aztec warrior wearing a fearsome Jaguar costume uses a stone knife to cut down a conquistador who lies dead, still encased in his armor.

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Rivera also painted scenes of what he saw as capitalist oppression in the U.S. and the struggle for workers’ rights in a rapidly industrializing America.

“He made pictures that made us think about what our society is like, about labor and class, and the inequities of our modern world,” MoMA curator Leah Dickerman said. She points to the mural, Frozen Assets, a depiction of New York City, in 1931, in the depths of the Great Depression. The mural has several tiers, with New York’s new skyscrapers towering above what looks like a subterranean morgue.

“In the top tier of the painting, you see all the most recent landmarks of modern architecture,” Dickerman says. “Under that, you see the shelter for unemployed men that was on East 25th Street. Then under that, you see a bank vault where the city’s richest citizens are waiting to count their assets.”

Rivera was already famous when he and his wife, artist Frida Kahlo, arrived in New York for the MoMA commission. Born in 1886, Rivera had studied painting in Europe in the early 1900s.

There he developed, then abandoned, an interest in Cubism in favor of realistic frescoes – paintings on wet plaster – focusing on Mexico’s revolution. At the time, murals were Mexico’s leading public art form.

The show also includes watercolors from a visit to Moscow in 1927-1928, where Rivera celebrated the tenth anniversary of the Soviet revolution.

Visitors have packed the show since its opening in November. Art historian Anna Indych-Lopez said that’s because Rivera’s message remains relevant.

“This work speaks to people today for obvious reasons,” she said. “If we just open up the newspaper and look at the events surrounding Occupy Wall Street, these are issues that have not gone away.”

“What he was showing, really, was his interest in the uprising of the common people,” says visitor Lenore Zarin. Paula Santos, also visiting the show, said as a Mexican American, she was touched by Rivera’s dedication to “people you don’t usually see, indigenous people.” “It was really poignant for me,” she said, “that even today, he could have painted those frescoes.”

The MoMA show also includes a sketch for one of Rivera’s most famous works, although few people ever saw it.

Man at the Crossroads was the title of the work commissioned in 1933 by New York’s Rockefeller family, for one of its Rockefeller Center buildings. It was supposed to illustrate the progress of “civilization” on a grand scale. But a controversy erupted in the press over Rivera’s insertion of a small portrait of Lenin. The artist refused the Rockefellers’ request to remove it, and he was dismissed. The mural was covered up and later destroyed.

Indych-Lopez, an expert on Rivera, said the artist’s radical politics, typical among Mexican artists of the time, was indulged by his patrons, including MoMA founder Abby Aldrich Rockefeller.

Indych-Lopez said the management of Rockefeller Center, charged with leasing office space in the building, strongly objected.

“They believed they had to make a public stand against this very overt visualization of communism, the fact that this was a public gesture that would have faced workers entering into the heart of capitalism day in and day out,” she said.

Dickerman and Indych-Lopez also cite reports that the Rockefellers were offended by the inclusion of a portrait that appeared to be the teetotaling patriarch, John D. Rockefeller, holding a drink, during the period of prohibition.

In the ensuing furor, Rivera lost a commission to paint at the World’s Fair in Chicago. Undaunted, he returned to Mexico City and created an almost identical mural for the Palacio De Bellas Artes.

The show at MoMA is on view until mid-May 2012.